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Communication in the Real World: Blog

Entries in Media (2)

Thursday
Jan302014

Media Multitasking - Are We Addicted To Technology? Do We Have Shorter Attention Spans?

Of course, the questions I pose - "Are we addicted to technology?" and "Do We Have Shorter Attention Spans?" - are loaded. They aren't "yes" or "no" questions. True, research shows that we multitask with media more often than ever before, but the effects of that multitasking on our attention and productivity aren't cut and dry. Anecdotally, I know most of us (at least those of us over 30) would probably have negative things to say about media multitasking, like: " My students can't sit through a class without checking their phones." of "My daughter texts, tweets, and listens to Spotify while she's doing her homework."

There is a growing body of research on media multitasking. You can see a blog entry I wrote about it last year here: http://www.richardgjonesjr.com/blog/2013/4/8/digital-natives-and-media-multitasking-should-students-be-ab.html

For an in-depth discussion of media multitasking, check out the Kaiser Family Foundation's report.

Below is a great infographic from OnlineSchools.org about the interaction between media multitasking and learning:

Online Learning and Multitasking

Thursday
Mar072013

The Media as "Watchdog" In a Democratic Society: Or is "Lap Dog" or "Attack Dog" More Apt?

While countries like China, North Korea, Syria, and Burma have media systems that are nearly if not totally controlled by the state regime, the media in the United States and many other countries is viewed as the “watchdog” for the government. This watchdog role is intended to keep governments from taking too much power from the people and overstepping their bounds.

Central to this role is the notion that the press works independently of the government. The “freedom of the press” as guaranteed by our first amendment rights allows the media to act as the eyes and ears of the people. The media is supposed to report information to the public so they can make informed decisions. The media also engages in investigative reporting, which can uncover dangers or corruption that the media can then expose so that the public can demand change.

Of course, this ideal is not always met in practice. Some people have critiqued the media’s ability to fulfill this role, referring to it instead as a lapdog or attack dog. In terms of the lapdog role, the media can become too “cozy” with a politician or other public figure, which might lead it to uncritically report or passively relay information without questioning it. Recent stories about reporters being asked to clear quotes and even whole stories with officials before they can be used in a story drew sharp criticism from other journalists and the public, and some media outlets put an end to that practice.

In terms of the attack-dog role, the twenty-four-hour news cycle and constant reporting on public figures has created the kind of atmosphere where reporters may be waiting to pounce on a mistake or error in order to get the scoop and be able to produce a tantalizing story. This has also been called being on “scandal patrol” or “gaffe patrol.” Media scholars have critiqued this practice, saying that too much adversarial or negative reporting leads the public to think poorly of public officials and be more dissatisfied with government. Additionally, they claim that attack-dog reporting makes it more difficult for public officials to do their jobs.

Questions to Consider:  

1. In what ways do you think the media should function in a democratic society?

2. Do you think the media in the United States acts more as a watchdog, lapdog, or attack dog? Give specific examples to support your answer.

3. In an age of twenty-four-hour news and instant reporting, do you think politicians’ jobs are made easier or more difficult? Do you think reporters’ jobs are made easier or more difficult? Support your answers.